Best Digital Piano & Keyboard Headphones

When you’re first starting out in the magical world of musical instruments, it can be pretty daunting to practice when you think people might be able to hear you.

Not only can it be embarrassing for people to hear you hit all the wrong notes, it’s also not ideal for your whole household to have to listen to you playing continuous melodies every day.

We’re going to show you the best digital piano and keyboard headphones below so everyone can have peace of mind. 

Whether you’re a beginner or pro in the art of piano, you’ll always find yourself in need of some high-quality headphones to plug into your instrument.

Below are our favorite seven headphones and reviews on why they could work for you.

Best Digital Piano and Keyboard Headphones

  1. Sony MDR-7506
  2. Yamaha PRO 500
  3. Audio-Technica ATH-M40x
  4. Sennheiser HD 598
  5. Audio-Technica ATH-AR3BT
  6. Beyerdynamic DT 880 Edition
  7. V-Moda Crossfade M-100

Sony consistently releases quality electronics for musical purposes and these headphones are no different. The MDR-7506s are incredibly popular and one of the most widely used closed-back headphones used by professionals.

Their clear sound and reliability has set the bar for other headphones in the industry and other brands are having to match this standard. 

The primary reason this model is so popular is that they don’t color the audio in any way when reproducing it. Their neutral sound makes them great for digital pianos and keyboards because it’s easy to hear the subtle nuances of the notes extremely well. 

Closed back headphones typically have a lesser soundstage, however Sony have managed to provide a wider than average soundstage for their MDR-7506s.

If you’re looking to play your instrument with a backing track, these headphones also offer an abundance of separation between instruments. 

The closed-ear cups are particularly good at cancelling the noise from outside, as well as letting a minimal amount of sound leak out.

These headphones are sturdy and durable enough, however if robust and solid construction is a big factor for you, there are other headphones on this list that may suit your needs better.

The Sony MDR-7506s have been in the market for a long time, and for good reason too.

However there are few ways in which they could be improved, the main issue being the fact that they can heat up quite quickly and leave your ears feeling irritated after a long music session. 

Having said this, they have been available for years and are highly recommended by professional musicians. Despite the issues we mentioned prior, they sound great with digital pianos and keyboards.

These best selling headphones are excellent value for money - perhaps the best value for money on this list. 

Pros

  • Low noise leakage.
  • Wide soundstage considering they’re closed-back headphones.
  • Nicely balanced sound.
  • Excellent noise cancelling feature.
  • Top of the industry for reliability and clear sound.

Cons

  • Can become uncomfortable over a prolonged period of time.
  • Quick heat build-up isn’t ideal for everyone.

Yamaha are considered industry experts when it comes to musical instruments, creating amazing quality instruments and accessories.

It should be no surprise then that their name has found its way onto our list for the best digital piano and keyboard headphones.  

Perhaps the most eye-catching model included in this article, the Yamaha PRO 500s attractive exterior allows the user to appreciate the stylishness and well as the functionality without having to compromise the sound quality.

Another closed-back model, the PRO 500s produce exquisite noise cancellation and the soundstage is decently spacious considering this type. The sound quality is also incredibly high and precise. 

Yamaha has designed these headphones with 50mm drivers which are bigger than the industry standard.

This really affects the output in the best way, particularly the bass - the imposing sound compares well to Dre Beats headphones. 

With their decades of experience of pro-audio gear under Yamaha’s belt, it’s no wonder that these headphones are built with excellent quality. However, the build strength favors intelligent design rather than in durability.

The earcups fold in to make them more compact, however this model is still slightly bulkier than other headphones on the market.

These are widely considered the best Yamaha headphones for digital pianos and keyboards, and we have to agree. However there are always lesser appealing factors and the biggest one for the PRO 500s is the high price point.

If you’re looking for a set exclusively for practising at home, these may not be the best model for you. If you’re looking for a pair for studio work and playing outside as well as practicing, you may want to try these out. 

Whilst the PRO 500s are cleverly designed, the other consideration is the build quality as they’re not as sturdy and adjustable as they should be for their versatility.

If you’re lucky enough to have a head shape that this model was made for, then great! If not, there’s not much you can do about it to make them more comfortable. 

Leaving this on a high note, the sound given out of these headphones is rich and crisp. While these headphones will work best to replicate the sound of a Yamaha piano or keyboard, you can rest assured that they will work tirelessly to work perfectly with your instrument.

Pros

  • Strong bass.
  • Attractive design.
  • Detailed sound.

Cons

  • Higher price point compared to other models on our list.

Learners and studio professionals alike have been raving about Audio-Technica for years, and the ATH-M40x headphones are the overall top-rated model. In other words, these are the best of the best.

The ATH-M40xs adopt a closed back design with perfectly well balanced sound. Closed back models are often considered to give lower frequencies and less natural progression through the ranges, however this model doesn’t deliver these types of problems - only a sharp, shining even tone throughout.

This even tone captures the expression of the musical notes extremely well, giving you an authentic representation of your digital piano or keyboard’s sound. 

Audio-Techica takes great care designing its headphones, and it shows through them both looking and feeling great. The exterior is made from sturdy, durable plastic and a metal frame further reinforces the headband.

The headphones are made from professional materials without the professional price, making the ATH-M40xs great value. 

These high quality materials also make them able to cancel outside noise out pretty well. You’ll get one coiled and one straight cable as well as a quarter inch jack and 3.5mm mini-jack adapters.

The additional items that come with this model make the headphones versatile so they can match a variety of your needs. 

The Audio-Technica ATH-M40x headphones are a top pick for best digital piano and keyboard headphones, however there are some issues that shouldn’t be overlooked.

For instance the noise cancelling is pretty good indoors, but these may not be the right headphones for outdoor use. 

The soundstage is a little narrow compared to the other models we looked at above. Whilst the sound is precise and detailed, you won’t necessarily get the same feeling of freedom that other headphones can offer.

The lack of space could make your sound muddy if you’re using a backing track, so bear this in mind when choosing a model. 

However, if you’re looking to use them just for practising, this isn’t a big deal and these headphones will work great for you. These headphones are high-end quality with an affordable price tag. 

Pros

  • Well balanced sound, creating great sound quality.
  • Low sound leakage.
  • Versatile and adaptable to your needs.
  • Built with high quality materials.

Cons

  • Sound isolation isn’t as great as other models.
  • Closed back model means the soundstage isn’t very wide.

In comparison to the previous headphones on our list, Sennheiser’s open-backed headphones offer a modern twist on their bestselling HD 595s that have been flying off shelves for years. 

Perhaps the best thing about this model of headphones is the spacious, freeing sound they deliver.

The open backs are covered by an aesthetically pleasing metal grille, but don’t worry - this is durable so it won’t be snapping on you any time soon. 

The impressively wide range makes these headphones great for many different musical genres, in both playing and listening to them.

For example, a busy Latin song packed with movement between the ranges will be just as clear sounding as a slow, sultry ballad. 

Sennheiser designed their HD 598s to stand out from the other models on the market with a headband made of leather and foam instead of the widely used plastic and fleece-lined ear cups, making every part of these headphones feel luxurious and comfortable.

Although the look isn’t the most important factor when comparing headphones, the comfort and whether you’ll be able to wear them for long sessions are considerations that should be thought about. 

The twist-lock feature to ensure the cable doesn’t fall out whilst in use is a nice touch for these headphones.  

The modern design may not be to everyone's taste, but we think it’s a refreshing perspective on musical headphones. Anyone who buys open back headphones is desperate to hear that neverending stretch of soundstage, and the HD 598s deliver on this beautifully. 

However, whilst open back headphones triumph in their sound quality, their noise cancellation is minimized. You may want to consider this before you go using them in a crowded room or outside.

The higher price point makes them more suitable for advanced players, however, so this shouldn’t be a problem when being used in a professional studio.  

Pros

  • Open back design ensures a wide soundstage.
  • Well balanced sound.
  • Impressive bass without the loss of clarity.
  • Great for all sorts of genres of music.

Cons

  • Higher price point.

The only wireless headphones on our list, these defaultly become our top pick for the best wireless digital piano and keyboard headphones. Funny that!

Audio-Technica’s wireless technology can be paired with eight different devices at one time, so you can save time on unpairing one device before pairing the new one. You can be up to 10 meters away from your device and this model will still work.

This may not be an important feature to piano players, but it’s handy to know you’d be able to take a bathroom break without breaking the connection. The drivers are an impressive 40mm which are extremely powerful - not bad for a model with such an affordable price point. 

Another closed back design, these have a decently narrow soundstage. However, this doesn’t affect their ability to perform well when used for keyboard and digital piano, and that’s why we’re all here after all. 

Sadly, that’s about where these headphones draw the line. There are no bells or whistles included which you’d typically get with wireless models, but again that’s reflected in the affordable price. 

The battery life is an impressive 30 hours, meaning you won’t run out of battery mid session. The exterior is a metal skeleton wrapped in plastic, so they’re not the toughest model out there but they’ll survive a couple bashes every now and again.

What’s more is they’re nice and comfortable, making it likely you’ll be able to wear these for a couple of hours without even one break. 

While the sound isn’t the greatest on this list, it will still suffice for piano users. The build quality is good, not great, and we think you see where we’re going with this - they’re a middle of the range model. We’ve included them on our list because they’re made by a respectable, trusted brand and because of their attractive price. 

Wireless headphones appeal to a lot of people nowadays which is why we included a pair on this list. However, the main drawback with these headphones is that the wireless feature doesn’t impact on pianists use that much, as you have to be right next to the piano to play it.

Furthermore, your digital piano or keyboard has to be Bluetooth compatible or you’d need to buy a USB transmitter. Having said this, if you’re worried your music is going to be interrupted by annoying wires hanging all over the place, maybe these could be worth a go. 

Another drawback is the slight lag with the performance of the headphones varying from one keyboard to the next.

You might get lucky, you might not. What’s the harm in a little guessing game? 

Pros

  • Low price point for wireless headphones.
  • Good wireless technology with impressive battery life.
  • Great sound for digital pianos and keyboards.

Cons

  • Controls can be a little hard to work.
  • The wireless feature isn’t as important for keyboard/piano use.

Beyerdynamic isn’t one of the household names to just anyone, but to musicians they’re a name that has been known for the best part of a century with their amazing, high quality pro-audio gear. 

The DT 880s aren’t closed backed, but haven’t fully committed to being open back either - they’re semi-open back which in theory should give you the best of both worlds.

There are three different versions available which you can choose between 32, 250 and 600 OHMs. Digital pianos and keyboards will benefit most from the 32 OHM option, but all can be used effectively. 

A wider,  spacious soundstage delivers an accurate and natural sound which will really enhance your piano performance. 

The DT 880s are manufactured in Germany and display the art of German engineering perfectly. The metal headband is covered in premium leather, making this model both comfortable and made to last. 

You’ll also get a three meter long cable with a quarter inch adapter and a 3.5mm plug. The cable is unfortunately unattachable, making it potentially harder to store and travel with them. 

This model of headphones are considered premium and one of the best headphones you can buy for digital pianos and keyboards in 2020. The only drawback is that there are a few models that offer a higher sound quality and better value for money.

Also, depending on how high you’ll be listening to your music, the sound leakage can be a little much when they’re turned higher than medium volume. 

This is arguably the model with the best build quality and highest comfort level on our list.

If you’re the type of person to become immersed in the music and lose track of time, these could be perfect for you as you won’t be constantly bothered by uncomfortable headphones.

Pros

  • Superior build quality and therefore comfort.
  • Spacious soundstage.
  • Earpads can be replaced once worn out.
  • Articulate, crisp sound.

Cons

  • May be a little more bulky than some users are used to.
  • High sound leakage from semi-open backs.

The V-Moda Crossfade M-100s are well known for being the go-to headphones for many renowned DJs around the world. This gives you a pretty good indication of their sound quality and price point. Eek. 

For your money you’ll get some high end features, for example the memory foam ear cups.

Along with the Beyerdynamic DT 880s, this is considered among the most comfortable models of headphones. The 50mm dual-diaphragm driver also rivals any ordinary driver on this list. 

The M-100s are particularly bass heavy, which explains why they’re so popular with DJs. However, this impeccable bass doesn’t sacrifice the soundstage or clarity, making the overall sound quality from these headphones outstanding. 

Along with the headphones you’ll get a one-button mic cable and a share play cable.

The latter of the two makes it easy for someone else to listen to your music whilst you’re still wearing your headphones.

These headphones are extremely versatile and popular for obvious reasons. However, for digital piano and keyboard playing a lot of their standout features become redundant.

There aren’t too many drawbacks we could pick up on, but the price is a little eye-widening. 

In regards to the sound quality - it’s beautiful but bass-heavy. Other models of headphones will bring a brighter sound for a cheaper price.

The V-Moda Crossfade M-100 are headphones that we’d suggest getting if you were looking for a high quality pair which could be used for multiple different occasions. 

Pros

  • Amazing bass with excellent clarity.
  • Durable design.
  • Share play cable that lets others listen to your music.

Cons

  • Very high price point.

Key Factors to Consider When Buying Digital Piano and Keyboard Headphones

Soundstage

Soundstage is how the headphones recreate audio. At a live music event the source audio is considered pure, and what the audience hears is dependent on whatever is reproducing the sound.

This is where the name soundstage comes from.

The term ‘wide soundstage’ means there is more clarity between the instruments playing. While playing the piano your music won’t become muddy and the sound will remain crisp, making this an important feature to look out for.

Furthermore, if you’re listening to music you’ll be able to hear the individual instruments clearly. 

Surroundings

Are your surroundings up to the task of providing you with an optimal place to practice? If you’re going to be practicing in a noisy environment, you’ll want to look for noise cancelling headphones so you can ignore the busy outside world. Closed back headphones are the best model for this.

However, if you’re looking for a model where other people won’t be able to hear you practice, you should choose a model that ensures there won’t be much sound leakage.

Comfort

Headphones are only as good as the length you can wear them without your ears hurting. The two main things to consider when choosing a comfortable model are poor audio quality and the fit and quality of the earpads and headband.

The former is the lesser thought about concern, however if you’re listening to a tinny or fuzzy sound for a prolonged period of time, your eardrums are probably going to get tired and maybe even cause a headache.

If the quality and fit of the construction are bad, the headphones may be so tight they hurt your ears, or too big so they keep sliding off uncomfortably. Remember to take notice of the materials used for the exterior of the headphones, as well as how adjustable they are. 

Design

Open back

Open back headphones come with one immediate drawback - their lack of noise isolation. This is a huge problem if you’re going to be using the headphones in noisy environments.

Sound leakage is also a disadvantage as not everyone wants to hear you play 24/7. However, there are some benefits to open back headphones. They tend to be the most comfortable models to wear for long periods of time as the airflow reduces heat. Open back models also have much more spacious soundstages. 

Closed back

Closed back headphones are the most popular and common design as they typically have a more powerful bass and lots of noise cancellation. This means they can be used outside as well as inside, giving closed back headphones a major advantage.

Just because they accentuate the bass doesn’t mean they can’t also offer a beautifully wide soundstage, either. However, their solid exterior makes it easy for moisture and heat to build up around the ears, making them less comfortable for the user. 

Our Final Thoughts

Us giving you our thoughts is all very well and good, but in the end it all comes down to what you want out of your headphones.

For beginners we suggest making comfort the top priority as you may not be at the stage yet where excellent sound quality is essential, so enjoy the comfortable earpads! Practice makes perfect and you need a model that’s going to let you get on with it without any interruptions. 

If you’re past the beginner stage, start thinking about the sound quality and how well the headphones would work in a studio. Finally, make sure you get the most out of your budget and choose the best digital piano and keyboard headphones for you. 

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